PLEASE NOTE: Due to the recent effects of the COVID-19, we are offering clients and prospective clients the ability to meet with us via telephone and/or video conferencing. It is important to us to continue to assist you in any way we can. Please do not hesitate to call our office and let our family help yours.

Dickman Law Firm Knowledge, Experience, Dedication

For Your Free Consultation 
Se Habla Español

As a result of Hurricane Ian, our office is experiencing technical difficulties with our phone lines. Until further notice please contact 239-691-9677 or 305-299-0881 or email us directly for assistance. Thank you.

Let Our Family Help Yours

Let Our Family Help Yours

Let Our Family Help Yours

  

Let Our Family Help Yours

3 FAQs About Modifying Child Support

On Behalf of | Dec 21, 2022 | Family Law | 0 comments

After a divorce, ex-spouses often must continue to work with one another for the benefit of the children. If the circumstances of one of the former spouses change, it may require modifying the court-ordered child support arrangement. Below are answers to three common questions on child support modifications.

1. Does Florida Allow Child Support Modifications?

Pursuant to Florida law, both the payer and receiver have the right to petition for a payment modification. The statutes require that the petitioner’s situation meets a minimum change of $50 or 15% to the agreed-upon payments.

2. What Constitutes a Significant Change in Circumstances?

As both parties move on with their lives, a number of life changes may create the need to revisit the child support payment. Whether this includes a loss of income or a new job that pays more, a person’s financial situation highly factors into the equation. Other reasons to petition for a modification include an unexpected illness or disability that affects income, a significant increase in costs associated with the children’s health or child care, or a change in timesharing.

3. Do the Courts Set Time Limits?

The courts do not take petitions for child support modifications lightly. Although unexpected changes happen in life, these should not equate to frequently or regularly requesting changes. The court often sets time limits to deter people from requesting changes. Depending on the circumstance, it may lead to up to a five-year wait for another request.

Regardless of which party needs a modification, requesting a change should happen as soon as possible to avoid potential nonpayment and ensure the children live in a thriving environment.